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Last weekend’s marches: A recap

Women's marches broke out over the world this past weekend. Here are the important ones to the Iowa City area.

January 24, 2017

 

 

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Photo Gallery: Emotions of the Women’s March on Washington D.C.

Allie Schmitt-Morris

A man at the Women's March yells at an anti-protester saying, "gays will not go away."

Photo Gallery: Emotions of the Women’s March on Washington D.C.

The biggest Women's March, taking place in Washington D.C., was full of frustration, happiness and sadness as women and men alike marched for human rights.

A man at the Women's March yells at an anti-protester saying, "gays will not go away."

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Photo Gallery: Women’s March on Chicago

Pareen Mhatre

A crowd of marchers fight for a range of issues, but as a whole, they are protesting against President Donald Trump, who was sworn in yesterday.

Photo Gallery: Women’s March on Chicago

More than 250,000 people joined the Women's March on Chicago to advocate for a multitude of issues, including protesting against newly inaugurated President Donald Trump.

People of all races, sexes, religions and background come together for the Women's March on Chicago on January 21st, 2017.

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Photo Gallery: Women’s March on Des Moines

Maggie Terry

Marchers walk under cloudy skies.

Photo Gallery: Women’s March on Des Moines

Des Moines held a women's march at the Iowa State Capitol with an estimated 26,000 attendants. See photos from the event here.

Marchers walk under cloudy skies.

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Iowa City residents gather and march for change

Fenna Semken

Junior high students Maddie and Lucy hold a sign to show what's on their minds.

Iowa City residents gather and march for change

The Iowa City women's march advocated for not only female rights, but overarching civil rights as well.

The grey, foggy weather matched the minds of many Iowa City residents the morning after President Donald Trump’s inauguration. Across the world, women’s marches broke out to advocate for women’s rights, and Iowa City, IA was a strong participant.

We need to protest what [Trump] and Mike Pence stand for and keep them from taking away our basic human rights.”

— Katherine Yacopucci ’20

The local march began at noon as protectors of rights gathered at the University of Iowa Library, taking a moment of silence for solidarity. After a two minute break in the chaos, “Let’s get rowdy,” was shouted by Director Corey Hickner-Johnson.

“The goal is to resist hate and all of its forms,” Hickner-Johnson said. “There has been a lot of rhetoric that is hateful to people of color, people of different gender orientations, queer people and people with disabilities, and we are protesting that hate.”

With that goal on their minds, the one thousand-some participants slowly marched to the Old Capitol, chanting and smiling all the way. The sheer volume of the event caught the attention of many passing by.

“This protest shows me that a lot of people care and that a lot of people are upset with the election and feel like they need to stand out and peacefully protest,” said University of Iowa Senior Antony. “There is a lot of discomfort in the population.”

All these people are here and we are using our bodies and our minds to stand up against hate and stand up for democracy. It will be effective.”

— Corey Hickner-Johnson, Director

The unease observed by those on the sidelines was expressed by one central concern among those marching- civil rights.

“I believe that women are not given equal rights and our new president has objectified women and turned them into sexual objects which just isn’t right,” said Katherine Yacopucci ’20. “I feel we need to protest what he and Mike Pence stand for and keep them from taking away our basic human rights.”

“We believe in rights and we believe that our new president is not giving us those,” said Southeast Junior High students Maddie and Lucy.

Others not only marched for their rights, but for acceptance and love.

Fenna Semken
Iowa City resident Erin stands with her family and friends at the start of the march.

“I am here to show that all people are important and loved,” said Iowa City Resident Erin. “I hope it will send a message that not all people are going to lay down and accept this new administration, and that we are going to continue to say out loud that it is not okay.”

That message, many believe, was effectively spread.

“All these people are here and we are using our bodies and our minds to stand up against hate and stand up for democracy,” Hickner-Johnson said. “It will be effective.”

See West High students reactions to the protest on Instagram below.

"Pulled up at the function like .... ✊?? . Here we go y'all," Jade Merriwether '17.

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