The mix of fashion and modesty

The+mix+of+fashion+and+modesty

Angela Zirbes

[Hijabi fashion] is popping out now because people are realizing you can incorporate fashion into something religious,”

— Lujayn Hamad '18

“Hijabi fashion is not new; it’s been going on,” Lujayn Hamad ‘18 said. She flips a long strand of her tanned, yellow pashmina scarf back, which covers her ears and hair. Her neck stands bare. Hijabi fashion trends have taken over social media like a storm, as an increase in Muslim fashion bloggers and Instagram models have used social media as their fashion outlet. The styles range from the long elegant dresses of the 1930’s to present day make-your-own-style, a blend of different styles.

Ala Mohamed
Lujayn Hamad ’18 shows off her laid back hipster look in her favorite flannel

“[Hijabi fashion] is popping out now because people are realizing you can incorporate fashion into something religious,” said Hamad. On Instagram pages like @Dope_hijab, @hijabmuslim and @hijabfashion, which have more than a couple thousand followers, people are hungry for change and a new way of looking at fashion. Hamad has also seen an increase in Hijabi fashion popping up on her social media account. This year,  Anniesa Hasibuan became the first Muslim women to take Hijabi fashion to the runway during New York Fashion Week, and Nura Afia became the first Muslim Hijabi CoverGirl ambassador. As I told Hamad this news she said, “You go girls, finally we are more than just scarf wearers.”

Hamad, being a Hijabi herself,  discusses her own style and how it came about. As she points to her light blue jeans rolled up and a boyfriend long-sleeve shirt, she said her fashion is her own and she tries to make things work or fit her style lens. Yet, the increase of Hijabi fashion awareness has made her excited to be apart of such a revolution. Yet, Hamad said as a Muslim, modesty is key. Hamad smiled as she said, “We are modest and finding clothes that identify who we are.”